Enhancing Pump Optimization and Energy Efficiency through Effective Assessment

While reliability has long been the larger focus of pump optimization, minimizing energy usage is becoming an increasingly important consideration in how we see and plan the optimization of pump systems.

Category: Blogs, Energy Efficiency May 13, 2022

By Peter Gaydon, Technical Director

By Peter Gaydon, Director, Technical Affairs for the Hydraulic Institute

While reliability has long been the larger focus of pump optimization, minimizing energy usage is becoming an increasingly important consideration in how we see and plan the optimization of pump systems.

Of course, maintaining that balance and correlation between spend and output is essential—either a reduction in maintenance spend or increase in output are fundamentals of optimization. However, if the pump system can minimize utility costs via reduced consumption of water and energy in a way that does not compromise reliability or output, optimization is achieved. Pump system assessments for existing systems are the path to optimizing a system and gaining an average of 20 percent energy saving.

So how do you shape an assessment to deliver that kind of result? There are three important factors to consider:

  • It must be well-rounded. Proper assessments provide a host of results to justify costs for improvements to the system’s design, control, operation, and maintenance. Improvements to pump systems for ultimate optimization can result in reduced system head (pressure), reduced system flow rate or operating time, more efficient equipment or controls, and/or improved maintenance or operation procedures.
  • It considers energy efficiency from the beginning. It starts with a level one assessment—a pre-screening and gathering system information for pumping systems. This data draws from equipment information, control schemes, operating parameters, reliability issues, and performance curves. With this information, potential for energy savings can be quantified, and recommendations for level two or three assessments can be made.
  • It is conducted by personnel from cross-functional backgrounds. Representation should include management, pump system analysis, specialists on system process, operations, maintenance and experts close to cost data. Consider certified professionals who can assist with this, known as a Pump Systems Assessment Professional. These experts have completed HI’s PSAP program, a certification program that sets the standard for the discipline of pump systems assessment and the use of pump system optimization techniques.

Before planning your next pump system assessment, check out HI’s Energy Efficiency resources, details on PSAP certification and other helpful tools.

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